Policies

Child Protection

Important


All reports regarding child protection or safeguarding should be made directly to: NSPCC 0800 800 5000
Call 999 if a child is in immediate danger. Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO)
01905 822666 Worcestershire Family Front Door Monday to Thursday from 9.00am to 5.00pm and Fridays from 9.00am to 4.30pm.
01905 768020 Worcestershire Family Front Door Out of Office
Making a written referral if the concern is not immediate: http://www.worcestershire.gov.uk/info/20641/are_you_a_professional_and_worried_about_child 01452 426565 Gloucestershire’s Help Desk 01452 614194 Gloucestershire’s Out of Hours Help Desk
Gloucestershire: https://www.gscb.org.uk/media/19429/dsl-handbook-version-live10-dec-17.pdf 01926 414144 Warwickshire MASH
Warwickshire MASH: https://www.warwickshire.gov.uk/childrens-social-care/child-safeguarding-procedures-professionals/4




Aims of this policy


We are committed to the safeguarding of children and vulnerable adults. Children are defined as anyone up to the age 18 years. This policy creates a framework to ensure that appropriate measures are taken by us and are aware of their responsibilities to identify, report and manage incidents of abuse or potential abuse against children or vulnerable adults. This includes:

  • Preventing the impairment of children’s health or development
  • Protecting children from maltreatment
  • Ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care.
  • Ensuring that everyone involved is child centred – i.e. the needs and views of the children are paramount




Types of abuse


The DfE (Department for Education) define 4 types of abuse: Physical Abuse: Hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also include fabricating the symptoms of, or deliberately inducing, illness. Emotional Abuse: Persistent emotional maltreatment of a child causing severe and adverse effects to emotional development. Emotional abuse may involve:

  • Conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person.
  • Not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate.
  • Age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction.
  • Seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another (for example violence in the home).
  • Serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.
Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone. Sexual Abuse: Forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. Sexual abuse may involve:
  • Physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non- penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing.
  • Non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet).
  • Discussions relating to sexual behaviour, human reproduction or interpersonal interaction between humans of both/either sex where it is not relevant to the specific lessons being undertaken
Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children. Neglect: The persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may include:
  • Maternal substance abuse during pregnancy.
  • A parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.
  •  Neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.
Specific safeguarding issues which may indicate abuse and links to further resources where available (this list is not exhaustive):
  • Child sexual exploitation (CSE) – NSPCC Child Sexual Exploitation
  • Bullying including cyberbullying – NSPCC Bullying & Cyberbullying
  • Domestic Violence – NSPCC Domestic Abuse
  • Drugs – NSPCC Drugs & Alcohol
  • Fabricated or induced illness – NHS Fabricated or Induced Illness
  • Faith abuse – Metropolitan Police Child Abuse Linked to Faith or Belief
  • Female genital mutilation (FGM) – NSPCC Female Genital Mutilation
  • Forced marriage – Gov.uk Forced Marriage
  • Gangs and youth violence – NSPCC Gangs and Young People Gender-based violence/violence against women and girls (VAWG) – Education.gov.uk Violence Against Women & Girls
  • Mental health – NSPCC Mental Health & Suicidal Thoughts
  • Private fostering – Surrey County Council Private Fostering
  • Radicalisation – NSPCC Protecting Children From Radicalisation
  • Sexting – NSPCC Sexting
  • Teenage relationship abuse – NSPCC Partner Exploitation and Violence in Teenage Intimate Relationships
  • Trafficking - NSPCC Child Trafficking




Roles and Responsibilities


We are responsible for Child Protection:

  • Reporting all allegations made against us to the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) or the NSPCC
  • Referring all cases of suspected abuse to the relevant local authority, the NSPCC, social care, or school child protection officer of the child’s school
  • Managing child protection related information. Ensure child protection files are stored appropriately and respond to requests for information sharing from the local authority, NSPCC, the child’s school or other agencies
  • Ensuring continuous development and annual review of child protection policies and procedures
  • Ensuring we receive adequate training and support relating to child policy and procedures so that policies are known and used appropriately
  • Undergoing appropriate child protection training at least every two years
  • Read and understand provided materials relating to child protection
  • Ask questions or seek clarifications where required policy and guidance are not understood
  • Follow guidance and procedures appropriately, including responding to disclosures, escalating all referrals or related information to the NSPCC or social care immediately and respecting confidentiality.




Child Protection Procedures


Responding to a Disclosure We must be aware of how to respond to disclosure of information which leads to child protection concerns. A disclosure can be made by a child or adult about themselves or another child or adult. When information is shared with us, which causes concerns of possible abuse, our requirement is to accept the information being shared without influencing it, as well as providing support and reassurance to the child and managing expectation. When information is disclosed you must:

  • Be clear that confidentiality cannot be guaranteed. The safety of children overrules confidentiality concerns.
  • Avoid leading questions. Listen carefully to what is being said and allow the child to speak without interruption as much as possible.
  • Accept what is being told without judgement and avoid overreacting with a strong emotional response, it is important to remain calm during the disclosure.
  • Offer support and explain to the child they have not done another wrong sharing the information with you.
  • Clearly and calmly explain what we will do next and that we will need to share what has been discussed with another adult who can help.
  • Immediately after the disclosure make a written record of events. Be as clear and precise, use the same words the child used, make note of the date, time, venue, who was present and the behaviours, mood and actions of the child during the disclosure. Do not create this record during disclosure. Full attention should be given to the disclosure itself and making notes may influence what information is shared.
  • It is not our role to investigate. We must always refer, never investigate.
What to do if we have a concern relating to child protection as a result of disclosure, observation of behaviour (of a child or adult), something another adult has said to us or any other reason for concern:
  1. Tell the child what we will do next. Do not promise to keep the information a secret, reassure the child we will need to tell somebody else who can help.
  2. Write down what has been told / have observed. Do this as soon as possible after the event. Try to avoid placing own values on the record of events, use their own words and phrasing, not our own. Document the date, time and place of the event as well as who else was there. Make note of actions, behaviours and mood during the event.
  3. Call 0800 800 5000 and speak with the NSPCC directly / the Local Authority Designated Officer for the county (contact numbers page 1). Share the information with the relevant child protection officer at the child’s school / local authority.
  4. Record the lead officer in charge of investigating and responding to the information and inform what further involvement may be required of us. Await instruction, do not make independent decisions regarding, for example, informing the parents or other staff – the relevant authority will manage a co-ordinated response and inform us of the decisions taken.
  5. Record the phone call in writing, including point 4 and details of what is required.
  6. We will create a regularly updated child protection log of the incident, inform relevant authorities/NSPCC of any disclosures. All information sharing will be logged as part of the child protection file.
  7. Contact social care and the NSPCC/Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) if nothing has been heard after 3 days of sharing of the information with them.




Allegations against us


Allegations of abuse against us made by either a child or an adult and should be made immediately to the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) or the NSPCC.




Code of Conduct


We are committed to the safeguarding the welfare of children.
We are required to provide a safe learning environment for the student and themselves during tuition and immediately refer safeguarding concerns to the NSPCC/ Local Authority Designated Officer, this includes but is not limited to:

  • Acting as a positive role model.
  • Never asking a student personal questions about their background.
  • Never comment on a student’s appearance or give inappropriate praise.
  • Never inviting a student back to other non-tutoring venue.
  • Never suggesting or taking a student on an excursion.
  • Never giving the student a gift without parent/carer approval – all gifts/rewards must be disclosed in lesson summaries (All gifts/rewards must be for achievement and not an occasion).
  • Not providing transport for the student to or from the tuition venue, or organising transport on the students’ behalf. If the individual responsible for collecting the student after tuition does not arrive as expected and cannot be contact them yourself.
  • Not sharing personal contact details such as mobile phone number, email address or social networking information with the student.
  • Not making physical contact with students unless it is essential to safeguard the pupil or yourself.
  • Immediately referring suspected signs of neglect and abuse (including physical, emotional or sexual) to the NSPCC and LADO. Always refer, never investigate yourself.
  • Ensuring that in all correspondence (electronic or written) the pupil is only referred to using their first name. Do not use the pupil’s full name or surname unless written permission is given by the parent e.g. exhibition pieces.
  • Taking of photographs or recording videos of pupils unless written permission has been obtained from the parent/guardian.
  • We are also required to have read ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’.




Author & Review


Issue Date: March 2020 Review Date: March 2021 Written by: Nicola Redgewell





Lone Working Policy

Principles


The aim of this policy is to safeguard all students and all other persons involved in tuition provided by Nicki Reg.
Anyone who works with the students must ensure that they are fully aware of the procedures in place to protect themselves and the students they are working with.

  • We should be seen to be working in an open and transparent way.
  • We should always act, in the child’s best interests.




Confidentiality


  • We should be clear around what information about a student can be shared and in what circumstances it is appropriate to do so.
  • We will be no email communication directly between the students. All email correspondence sent to the parent/responsible adult.




Propriety and Behaviour


We must follow the code of conduct below:

  • We should wear clothing that is appropriate to the role, which is not seen as offensive, revealing or sexually provocative.
  • We should be vigilant in maintaining privacy and mindful of the need to avoid placing themselves in a vulnerable situation.
  • We should not administer medication – the parent/carer should do this if necessary, unless if it is for life threatening purposes e.g. Epi-pen
  • Personal mobile phone use should be avoided whilst teaching.




Communication


  • We should not give out our personal phone number, home address or email address to students.
  • We should not use the internet or web-based communications to interact with students.
  • We should have no secret social contact with students or their parents.
  • We should be aware of Health and Safety Regulations.




Art Lessons and Workshops


  • We should ensure that any cause for concern is discussed with the NSCPP / Local Authority Designated Officer and that safeguarding procedures are followed in accordance with the Nicki Reg Child Protection Policy and Safeguarding Policy.
  • If working away from the studio, we should never enter a house or venue alone to run a lesson or workshop without the presence of parent/carer.
  • We should ensure that when working alone we have their mobile switched on.
  • If working away from the studio, we should ensure that friends/family are aware of our whereabouts and expected return times.
  • If working away from the studio, we should work in open areas of the home or venue where the doors are left open.
  • If working in the studio, we have the door and window blinds open.
  • Parents/carers must have filled a contact details form and available for the duration of the tuition.
  • Always keep discussions on a professional level.
  • If working away from the studio and at any point during the lesson or workshop, we feel uncomfortable about any behaviour from the pupil or parent/carer we will end the activity and leave the setting. The circumstances should be recorded and if necessary reported to NSPCC / LADO as soon as possible.
  • If at any point during the art lesson or workshop at the studio, we feel uncomfortable about any behaviour from the pupil or parent/carer they should end the activity and parents/carers are contacted. The circumstances should be recorded and if necessary reported to NSPCC / LADO as soon as possible or call the police if unsafe.
Tutors should:
  • If working in the studio, we will remain in the studio for the art lesson / workshop.
  • If working away from the studio, we will remain in the designated room of the home or venue for the art lesson / workshop.
  • If a child needs the toilet and needs adult support, call parents/carers to assist their child.
  • If a child is upset, distressed or becomes unwell, call parents/carers to assist their child.
  • Ensure there is plenty of light.
  • Keep a clear focus on the work undertaken.
  • Always communicate and record any times where the pupil becomes upset, distressed or behaviour changes.
  • Display an emergency poster in the studio with contact details of next of kin and emergency services if anything happens to us e.g. become unwell, have an accident. Train the children and adults of how to use this.




Health and Safety


The very nature of one to one tuition lends itself to potential risks. We should take every reasonable step to eliminate potential risks to increase safety and confidence.
Please refer to the Health and Safety Policy.

  • Ensure that the environment does not display any inappropriate images or documentation capable of being viewed by the student or parent/responsible adult when conducting a session.
Tutors shall:
  • Treat students fairly and without prejudice or discrimination; students who have a disability or come from a minority ethnic or cultural group can easily become victims of discrimination and prejudice which may be harmful to the student’s wellbeing.
  • Ensure language is appropriate and not offensive or discriminatory.
  • Ensure any contact with the student is appropriate to their role as a tutor and confined to the relevant art lesson.
  • Not make any improper suggestions to a student.
  • Not send unsolicited communications to the student or parent/responsible adult.
  • Value and take students’ contributions seriously.
  • Record disputes with a student or parent/responsible adult
  • Report any inappropriate behaviour or illegal activity identified within the art lesson or workshop by the student or third party, in accordance with the procedures set out in Child Protection Policy.
Personal Safety Guidelines for Lone Workers
  • Always have a mobile phone charged and available
  • Keep your personal items, money, car keys, etc safe and secure
  • Keep a running record of each session – including brief notes of work covered, people present
  • and any other appropriate information, e.g. issues with pupil and/or parent.
  • Compile your own risk assessment of each venue and activity.
  • Know the safeguarding procedures.
  • If at any point we feel threatened we should ensure the pupil is left with a responsible adult and terminate the session. Any concerns for personal safety should be recorded and if necessary contact the NSPCC / LADO.
  • Display an emergency poster in the studio with contact details of next of kin and emergency services if anything happens to us e.g. become unwell, have an accident. Train the children and adults of how to use this.




Author & Review


Issue Date: March 2020 Review Date: March 2021 Written by: Nicola Redgewell





Safeguarding Policy

Designated Safeguarding Officer: Nicola Redgewell





Policy Statement


Safeguarding children is the action we take to promote the welfare of all children and protect them from harm.
Child Protection refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering or at risk of suffering harm. This policy applies to the business of Nicki Reg.
Under the 1989 and the 2004 Children Acts a child or young person is anyone under the age of 18 years. We recognise that all children have a right to protection from abuse and neglect and we accept responsibility to safeguard the welfare of all children. We intend to:

  • Maintain a policy of ‘it could happen here.’
  • Not promise confidentiality to the children.
  • Always act in the interests of the child.
  • Respond quickly and appropriately where information requests relating to child protection are made, abuse is suspected or allegations are made.
  • Provide children and parents with the chance to raise concerns over their own care or the care of others.
  • Have a system for dealing with, escalating and reviewing concerns.
  • Remain aware of child protection procedures and maintain links with other bodies.
  • Make sure everyone has the right qualifications: Nicola Redgewell is a self-employed member of staff who is trained as a qualified teacher.
  • Establish a safe environment in which children can learn and develop.




Basic principles


  • The welfare of the child is paramount.
  • It is the responsibility of us to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people.
  • We are responsible for our own actions and behaviour and should avoid any conduct which would lead any reasonable person to question their motivation and intentions.
  • We should work and be seen to work, in an open and transparent way.
  • The same professional standards should always be applied regardless of culture, disability, gender, age, language, racial origin, religious belief and/or sexual identity.
  • We should continually monitor and review our practice and ensure we follow the guidance contained in this document and elsewhere.
  • We will ensure children and their families are able to share concerns and complaints and that there are mechanisms in place to ensure these are heard and acted upon.
  • Ensure we understand our responsibilities in being alert to the signs of abuse and responsibility for referring any concerns to the NSPCC/ Local Authority Designated Officer
  • Keep written records of concerns about children, even where there is no need to refer the matter immediately.
  • Ensure all records are kept securely and in locked locations marked Strictly Confidential.
  • Ensure that we read part 1 of Keeping Children Safe in Education.




Responsibilities


Nicola Redgewell is the Designated Safeguarding Officer (Level 3), is up to date with safeguarding training, has Enhanced DBSs from local schools and is a relief teacher for Worcestershire County Council. We would contact the NSPCC with any cause of concern 0800 800 5000, contact the local safeguarding authority, contact the child’s school and if necessary contact the police.




Training


Nicola Redgewell is the Designated Safeguarding Officer (Level 3). We have undertaken training and update our training every 2 years. Training includes:

  • DSO/DSL (level 3) Training – March 2020
  • Prevent - September 2019
  • FGM Training – September 2019
  • Online Safety – March 2019
  • Keep Them Safe - Protecting Children from Child Sexual Exploitation – February 2019
  • Keeping Children Safe 2020 - September 2020
We are required to have a certificate for safeguarding training on file dated within the last 2 years.




Types of Abuse


‘Abuse: a form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. They may be abused by an adult or adults or another child or children. Physical abuse: a form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child. Emotional abuse: the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill- treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone. Sexual abuse: involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children. Neglect: the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.’ Bullying and Cyberbullying Bullying can happen anywhere – at school, at home or online. It is usually repeated over a long period of time and can hurt a child both physically and emotionally. Child Sexual Exploitation and Grooming Child sexual exploitation is a form of child abuse, which involves children and young people (male and female, of a range of ethnic origins and ages, in some cases as young as 10) receiving something in exchange for sexual activity. Perpetrators of child sexual exploitation are found in all parts of the country and are not restricted to particular ethnic groups. We should be aware of the key indicators of children being sexually exploited, which can include:

  • going missing for periods of time or regularly coming home late;
  • regularly missing school or education or not taking part in education;
  • appearing with unexplained gifts or new possessions;
  • associating with other young people involved in exploitation;
  • having older boyfriends or girlfriends;
  • suffering from sexually transmitted infections;
  • mood swings or changes in emotional wellbeing;
  • drug and alcohol misuse; and
  • displaying inappropriate sexualised behaviour.
We should also be aware that many children who are victims of sexual exploitation do not recognise themselves as such. Where CSE, or the risk of it, is suspected, we should notify the NSPCC. If after discussion there remain concerns, local safeguarding procedures should be triggered, including referral to the local authority children’s social care and the police, regardless of whether the victim is engaging with services or not. Domestic Abuse Witnessing domestic abuse is child abuse, and teenagers can suffer domestic abuse in their relationships. There are no official statistics on the number of children who live with domestic abuse. But there are a lot of research studies that tell us about children’s experience of living with violence. Around 1 in 5 children have been exposed to domestic violence. Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to have behavioural and emotional problems. Fabricated and Induced Illness Fabricated or Induced Illness is a rare, potentially lethal form of abuse. Concerns will be raised for a small number of children when it is considered that the health or development of a child is likely to be significantly impaired or further impaired by the actions of a carer or carers having fabricated or induced illness. There are three main ways that the carer fabricates or induces illness in a child:
  1. Fabrication of signs and symptoms, including fabrication of past medical history;
  2. Fabrication of signs and symptoms and falsification of hospital charts, records, letters and documents and specimens of bodily fluids;
  3. Induction of illness by a variety of means.
The above three methods are not mutually exclusive. Harm to the child may be caused through unnecessary or invasive medical treatment, which may be harmful and possibly dangerous, based on symptoms that are falsely described or deliberately manufactured by the carer, and lack independent corroboration. (See also Medication and Mental Health Policy) Faith Abuse Child abuse is never acceptable wherever it occurs and whatever form it takes. Abuse linked to belief, including belief in witchcraft or possession, is a horrific crime, which is condemned by people of all cultures, communities and faiths. Standard child safeguarding procedures apply in all cases where abuse or neglect is suspected, including those that may be related to particular belief systems. The number of cases of child abuse linked to faith or belief in spirits, possession and witchcraft is believed to be small, but where it occurs it causes much distress and suffering to the child. It is likely that a proportion of this type of abuse remains unreported. Abuse linked to faith or belief may involve a wider context, where the child is treated as a scapegoat in circumstances of family stress, deprivation, domestic violence, substance abuse and mental health problems. Female Genital Mutilation FGM is a collective term for all procedures involving partial or total removal of external female genitalia for cultural or other non-therapeutic reasons. Typically it is performed on girls aged between 4-15 or on older girls before marriage or pregnancy. It is illegal in the UK and it is also illegal to take a child abroad to undergo FGM. There is a maximum prison sentence of 14 years for anyone found to have aided this procedure in any way. It is considered to be child abuse as it causes physical, psychological and sexual harm. FGM is more common than many people realise, both across the world and in the UK. In the UK it has been estimated that 24,000 girls under the age of 15 are at risk of FGM. UK communities that are most at risk of FGM include Kenyans, Somalis, Sudanese, Sierra Leoneans, Egyptians, Nigerians and Eritreans. However women from non-African communities that are at risk of FGM include Yemeni, Kurdish, Indonesian and Pakistani women. Girls are at particular risk of FGM during school summer holidays. This is the time when families may take their children abroad for the procedure. Many girls may not be aware that they may be at risk of undergoing FGM. In order to protect our children it is important that we are aware of the guidance that is available in respect of FGM and are vigilant to the risk of it being practised. Forced Marriage A forced marriage is when someone is made to marry another person who they don’t want to. Forced marriages can happen in secret and can also be planned by parents, family or religious leaders. It may involve physical abuse, sexual abuse or emotional abuse. Gangs and Youth Violence A gang can be a group of mates who hang around together, but some gangs are involved in crime and violence, including fighting other gangs and knife crime. Gang-associated young people are often exposed to a higher range of traumatic and abusive environments (including domestic violence) than other young people, even those in the youth justice system. These young people may have been involved in violence as a victim, perpetrator or witness. Gang-associated females may have a higher level of exposure to risk than gang-associated males. Such experiences can have a serious impact on mental health. There is strong evidence, for example, that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is linked to early experiences of violence and abuse. In addition, conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, anxiety disorders and psychosis can also be associated with exposure to violence. In turn, exposure to violence and / or mental health issues may also increase the likelihood of joining a gang. Research suggests that poor attachment relationships (i.e. the bond between the primary care giver and a child in the early stages of child development) may cause lasting neurological damage. There is anecdotal evidence (e.g. from voluntary sector organisations) that gang-associated young people often have attachment issues. Young people with such issues may feel a “need to belong”, potentially leading to them getting involved in a gang. In order to tackle violence affecting schools and the community, we believe is important to:
  1. Understand the problems young people are facing,
  2. Consider possible avenues of support,
  3. Work with a local partner (who may have valuable information, resources or expertise).
Gender Based Violence Gender based violence is the collective term for “violence that is directed against a woman because she is a woman, or violence that affects women disproportionately. It includes acts that inflict physical, mental or sexual harm or suffering, threats of such acts, coercion and other deprivations of liberty” (United Nations, 1992) It comprises a range of abuse that includes domestic abuse, rape and sexual assault, childhood sexual abuse, sexual harassment and stalking, commercial sexual exploitation, and harmful traditional practices such as female genital mutilation (FGM), forced marriage and so called ‘honour’ crimes. Being female is the key risk factor for gender-based violence. GBV cuts across all boundaries of age, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, religion and belief and socio economic inequality. Gender Identity and Sexuality Bullying is often an issue for children who behave in ways that don't fit into traditional ideas about gender roles. In group, other children may not want to work with or sit with them because "they don't act like boys" or "they don’t act like girls". The family may also be bullied and victimised. We seek eradicate all forms of homophobic and transphobic bullying. Mental Health The immediate and wider family has a profound influence on a child’s mental health. In the majority of cases, this influence is positive and supportive. However in some families, it can be a risk factor, for example where there is overt parental conflict, inconsistent or harsh discipline, or hostility or abuse. Some families face complex and multiple disadvantages, which make it difficult for a child to engage with schools and other services, which can support their mental health. Private Fostering Privately fostered children are a particularly vulnerable group of children whose welfare needs to be satisfactorily safeguarded and protected. They are a diverse and potentially vulnerable group with many not having a parent figure in a position to safeguard their welfare. A private fostering arrangement is one that is made privately (that is to say without the involvement of the LA) for the care of a child under the age of 16 (under 18 if disabled), by someone other than a close relative with the intention that it should last for 28 days or more. Private foster carers may be from the extended family such as a cousin or great aunt. However a person who is a relative under the Children Act 1989 i.e. a grandparent, brother, sister, uncle or aunt (whether full or half blood or by marriage) or a step-parent will not be a private foster carer. A private foster carer may be a friend of the family, the parent of a friend of the child or someone previously unknown to the child’s family who is willing to privately foster a child. If you think a child in the educational setting is being privately fostered, we will make a referral to the Children and Families Helpdesk – 01452 426565. Social care will undertake an assessment of the private fostering arrangement, which will include safeguard checks on the carers and contacting the child's parents. A worker will be allocated until the child is 16 and the arrangement will be monitored and reviewed and the young person visited on a regular basis. Radicalisation Radicalisation is defined as causing someone to become an advocate of radical political or social reform by supporting terrorism and violent extremism. Radicalisation of children and young people may include encouraging them to undertake violent activities on the grounds of religious belief. Children may be exposed to messages about terrorism through a family member or friend, a religious school or group, or through social media and the internet. This creates the risk of a child or young person being drawn into criminal activity and exposure to significant harm. Sexting 'Sexting' is the exchange of self-generated sexually explicit images, through mobile picture messages or webcams over the internet. Young people may also call it: Cybersex or sending a nudie, picture or selfie. Young people may see 'sexting' as harmless activity but there are risks. Taking, sharing or receiving an image, even voluntarily, can have a long-lasting negative impact. It may be common but 'sexting' is illegal. By sending an explicit image, a young person is producing and distributing child abuse images and risks being prosecuted, even if the picture is taken and shared with their permission. It is easy to send a photo or message but the sender has no control about how it is passed on. When images are stored or shared online they become public. They can be deleted on social media or may only last a few seconds on apps like Snapchat, but images can still be saved or copied by others. These images may never be completely removed and could be found in the future, for example when applying for jobs or university. Young people may think 'sexting' is harmless but it can leave them vulnerable to:
  1. Blackmail: An offender may threaten to share the pictures with the child's family and friends unless the child sends money or more images.
  2. Bullying: If images are shared with their peers or in school, the child may be bullied.
  3. Unwanted attention: Images posted online can attract the attention of sex offenders, who know how to search for, collect and modify images.
  4. Emotional distress: Children can feel embarrassed and humiliated. If they are very distressed this could lead to suicide or self-harm.
Pupils need to know what can happen when things go wrong. Talk to the pupils:
  1. Ask pupils if they would want something private shown to the world.
  2. Explain that photos are easy to forward and can be copied.
  3. Talk about whether a person who sends a request is likely to be asking other people to do the same.
  4. Mention about watching 'Exposed', a video by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), which shows the consequences of sharing images:
  5. Reassure pupils that teachers are always there for support if they feel pressured by anyone.
  6. Mention that ChildLine have an app called Zipit, which can help diffuse situations where a child is asked to ‘sext’. To find out more about the app visit www.childline.org.uk/zipit
Relationship Abuse and Peer to Peer Abuse If we identify children experiencing or witnessing relationship abuse or peer to peer abuse need to refer them on to other statutory services to ensure they are safe and properly protected from harm. There will need to be a co-ordinated response from children’s social care services, police, youth offending teams and health services. Criminal justice agencies and children’s services should work together to ensure the best outcomes for young people. Trafficking Child trafficking is child abuse. Children are recruited, moved or transported and then exploited, forced to work or sold. Children are trafficked for sexual abuse, benefit fraud, forced marriage, domestic servitude such as cleaning, childcare, cooking, forced labour in factories or agriculture, criminal activity such as pick-pocketing, begging, transporting drugs, working on cannabis farms, selling pirated DVDs and bag theft. Once a child has been identified as a victim of trafficking they need to be appropriately protected and supported. This may include immediate emergency protection, assessment of their needs, a safe place to live, interpreters, therapeutic services, witness support so they can testify against the traffickers, advocacy, help with obtaining documentation and with immigration or returning to their home country, reunification and education and developing self-protection skills.




Photographs, Images and Video


To protect children we will:

  • Seek parental consent for photographs to be taken or published (for example on our website, social media or in newspapers and/or publications)
  • Only use Nicki Reg’s equipment
  • Only take photos and videos of children to celebrate achievement.
  • Use only the child’s first name with an image, unless specified not through parental consent. Ensure that the children are appropriately dressed.
  • Encourage children to tell us if they are worried about any photographs that are taken of them.




Helpful Organisations


Advisory Centre for Education (ACE) - 020 7354 8321 Bullying Online - www.bullying.co.uk
Children's Legal Centre - 0845 345 4345
KIDSCAPE Parents Helpline (Mon-Fri, 10-4) - 0845 1 205 204 NSPCC - 0808 800 5000 - www.nspcc.org.uk Parentline Plus - 0808 800 2222
Youth Access - 020 8772 9900 Visit the Kidscape website - www.kidscape.org.uk, for further support, links and advice




Author & Review


Issue Date: March 2020 Review Date: March 202 Written by: Nicola Redgewell





Privacy Policy

Introduction


Nicki Reg is committed to ensure that your privacy is protected.
The purpose of this privacy notice is to give you a clear explanation about how your information is collected, used and shared when you have lessons and workshops with Nicki Reg, visit www.nickiregart.co.uk, the social media sites linked on this website and any linked websites.




Important Information


This privacy policy sets out how Nicki Reg uses and protects any information that you give Nicki Reg.
We are committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will be only used in accordance with this privacy statement.
We may change this policy when necessary. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes.




What information we collect about you


We will collect the following personal information from you depending on the services you are using. Regular Lessons / Mini Lessons / Workshops

  • Name of student, name of parents / carers (if applicable), DOB, age, school, home address, telephone numbers, email address, emergency contacts
  • Consent for photographs of the students and/or artwork produced by the adults and children on social media and the website
  • Consent to send emails and promotions, via Gmail and MailChimp
  • Medical information including doctor’s name, address and telephone number
  • Care plan for emergency medical procedures
Regular Lessons / Mini Lessons / Workshops (taught in educational sites or for educational purposes e.g. schools)
  • Photographs of the artwork (NB: photographs of the artwork will go on social media and the website only if the school in question have given their permission and checked their data / parents’ consent on individual children).
  • Age / year group of the artwork
  • When tutoring children at a school, the information of the child stays at the school they attend and will not go offsite.
Training (educational sites / for educational purposes e.g. schools)
  • Contact name and email from individuals with their consent
  • Publically available school information: address, telephone number, email
Exhibitions / Events / Training
  • Contact name and email from individuals with their consent
  • Your questions, comments, product reviews, surveys and forms you complete
Website
  • Page visits and statistics
  • Name and email
  • Enquires, questions and comments
MailChimp/Gmail
  • Name and email
  • Interests of art
Accounting (Quickbooks, Stripe)
  • Name and email
  • Adult and Child lesson details (name, date(s) of lessons)
  • Invoicing details
  • Cash and bank transaction details
Arts Award – Trinity College London
  • Name and age of child
  • Sending portfolios and work for moderation
  • For certificates

Zoom/Whatsapp – for online tutoring

  • Name
  • Email
  • Telephone number

NHS Test and Trace (in the event that COVID-19 is positive in the household)

  • Name
  • Contact details
Selling of teaching resources, paintings, prints, commissions and cards (directly, via the website or through nuMonday)
  • Name
  • Billing and delivery address
  • Email address




How we use the information about you and/or your child


  • Internal record keeping
  • For fulfilment of your lesson, workshop or training booking or product purchase
  • Respond to your queries and/or requests
  • To send you promotional emails via gmail and MailChimp about lessons, workshops, training, events, exhibitions, competitions, products, special offers and news.
  • For promotions and advertising on social media, our website and press releases – signed consent for this is needed
  • We do not sell your data to any third-party organisation. We share limited amounts of data with third parties to deliver our products and services to you, for e.g. delivery names and address for parcel delivery.
  • For labels for artwork if on display in exhibitions
  • Photographs of a child – signed consent for this is needed
  • For delivering artwork
  • For emergencies
  • Safeguarding matters
  • Accident forms for legal requirements
  • Medical information for medical emergencies
  • For invoicing and payments
  • Communication purposes between adults and us, using Facebook Messenger and Page Inbox, Instagram Direct Message, Twitter messaging, telephone calls and email, using Gmail and MailChimp.
  • Zoom and Whatsapp video calls.
  • For sending teaching resources via email




Cookies


When you visit the website, we automatically collect certain information about your device, including information about your web browser, IP address, time zone, country you are from, and some of the cookies that are installed on your device. Additionally, as you browse the site, we collect information about the individual web pages or products that you view, what websites or search terms referred you to the site and information about how you interacted with the site.
Cookies are data files that are placed on your device or computer and often includes an anonymous unique identifier. For more information about cookies, and how to disable cookies, visit www.allaboutcookies.org Log files track actions occurring on the site and collect data including your IP address, browser type, Internet service provider, referring/exit pages and date/time stamping.
Web beacons, tags and pixels are electronic files used to record information about how you browse the site.
If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year. If you have an account and you log in to this site, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser. When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select "Remember Me", your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed. If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.
We use Wix.com to help use to understand how our customers use the website. You can read more about how Wix.com uses your personal information here: https://www.wix.com/about/privacy We use Gmail for email communications. You can read more about how Gmail uses your personal information here: https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en-US We use MailChimp for email and promotional communications. You can read more about how MailChimp uses your personal information here: https://mailchimp.com/about/security/ We use QuickBooks for invoicing. You can read more about how QuickBooks uses your personal information here:https://quickbooks.intuit.com/uk/privacy-policy/ We use Arts Award Trinity College London for qualifications. You can read more about how Trinity College uses your personal information here: https://www.trinitycollege.com/about-us/policies We use Zoom and WhatsApp for online lessons. You can read more about how these companies uses your personal information here: https://zoom.us/privacy-and-legal and https://www.whatsapp.com/privacy We use nuMonday for online sales. You can read more about how nuMonday uses your personal information here: https://www.numonday.com/legal/ Comments When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.
An anonymised string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment. Comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service. Contact Form We use a contact from via WIX to manage contact form submissions. This information is sent as email messages. The information is stored on the business email contacts.
Contact Form may be checked through an automated spam detection service. Other websites Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.
These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website. The website and social media may have links to other websites or social media pages. However, once you have used these links to leave the site, you should note that we have no control over that website or social media page.




How long do we keep your information?


We will hold on to your information for as long as your enquiry has been completed, tutoring sessions have been cancelled or purchasing of artwork has been completed.
If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognise and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue. If we believe it is spam, it will be deleted as spam. For users that register on our website (if any), we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.
Any child and adult forms completed will be destroyed six months after the last art lesson.




Security


Unfortunately, the transmission of data via the internet is not completely secure. Although we will do her best to protect your personal details, we cannot guarantee that security of your data transmitted to the website and social media. Any transmission of data is at your own risk.
Once we have received your information, we will use strict procedures and security features to try to prevent unauthorised access. We will be obliged by law to respect and abide by the confidentiality of our users’ personal data.
When tutoring personal information is given by hand it will be stored onsite. It will be destroyed 6 months since the last lesson has been completed unless specified by the parent/carer.




Your rights over your information


The law gives you the right to access information held about you. If you want any information about how we have held your personal information, contact us via the contact form on the website, email us, message us via social media sites or speak to us in person.
If you believe that any information that we hold is incorrect, you can correct this by updating your profile through the contact form on the website, email, messaging via social media sites, change the tutoring form or redo a new one or speak to us in person.
You can ask us to stop holding your personal information. You will need to contact us to do this.




Contact Us


For more information about our privacy practices, if you have any questions, or if you like to make a complaint, please contact me via the contact form via the website or speak to Us in person if you or your child have lessons.




Author & Review


Issue Date: March 2020 Updated: July 2020 Review Date: March 2021 Written by: Nicola Redgewell





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